Some Reasons Why You Should Consider Training As A Court Reporter

There are several names by which those in this occupation are sometimes called. They can be known as voice writers, stenotype reporters or transcribers. The court reporter creates an accurate transcription of official proceedings. These transcriptions are used for future reference and for research purposes. This job requires a very high level of accuracy and attention to detail. People in this occupation are often highly intelligent and multilingual.

Stenographic reporting is the most common method. The operator use a stenotype machine and is able to press multiple keys at a time to represent sounds, phrases and words. Modern technology allows for the machine to be linked to a computer system that translates the shorthand from the stenotype machine into text that appears instantly on the computer screen.

Another popular method is electronic reporting. The transcriber uses audio equipment to record the proceedings. Apart from overseeing the proper operation of the equipment, he also takes notes aimed at clarification and identification of the speakers. The recording is then later transcribed. The main disadvantage of this method is that the records of the proceedings are not available immediately.

One of the most technologically advanced methods is voice writing. The reporter speaks into a voice silencer that ensures that the proceedings are not disrupted. All testimony is repeated into a hand held mask that houses a microphone. Gestures and emotional reactions are also recorded, requiring a high degree of skill. Speech recognition systems are sometimes used to provide an instant real time transcript.

This occupation is not limited to courtroom work. While these services are of immense value to the judiciary, transcribers are also in high demand for the recording of depositions, arbitration hearings and many other meetings where an exact record of the proceedings is required. Some earn a extra income from the sale of their transcriptions for study and research purposes. Many also earn an income from recording speeches and lectures.

There is more to this occupation than just he actual recording of proceedings. Voice writers and stenotype reporters have to create and maintain the computer dictionaries that are used to translate the keystrokes or voice into text. It is sometimes even necessary to customize the dictionaries for proceedings where specialized terminology will be used. Other tasks include the editing of transcriptions for grammar and spelling errors.

In order to qualify for this type of work intensive training in English and business law is necessary. There is also a high emphasis on legal and medical language. Training is offered by most business schools, and some colleges and universities. Examinations involve both theoretical tests and practical assessments. Qualified reporters are required to perform transcriptions at approximately two hundred and fifty words per minute.

To become a court reporter it is necessary to be highly organized, precise and disciplined. Most members of this profession earn a good income, they are highly regarded and their services are sought after. Many disputes and potential misunderstandings have been avoided or solved because of the existence of accurate records of proceedings.

Understanding Wrongful Termination Law

There is no getting around the fact that Arizona employment laws are generally quite friendly to employers when it comes to a question of wrongful termination. Many Arizona employment lawyers frequently recount the truism that an employee may be filed for a good reason or for no reason whatsoever, as long as he isn’t fired for a bad reason.

The bad reasons are what keep plaintiffs’ attorneys in business. Although every case is different and recently terminated employees should consult with an employment attorney to discuss the specific circumstances of their case, unlawful reasons for terminating an employee include termination decisions based on the race, sex, religion or age of the employee.

Arizona also has a statute prohibiting termination as retaliation for reporting a violation of an Arizona statute. There are many other similar state and federal laws that preclude termination in retaliation for an employee’s lawful reporting of the employer’s actual or suspected violation of the relevant law. These retaliation statutes may create liability where the employer wasn’t even guilty of the underlying offense, so employers should be very careful about making a decision to terminate an employee who has complained of or reported any sort of discrimination, safety violation, or other legal issue. Arizona employers who believe they need to fire such an employee should consult with an Arizona employment lawyer first.

Employees who believe they have valid wrongful termination claims should seek the advice of an Arizona employment attorney as soon as possible, because the statutes of limitation pertaining to both state and federal law violations are relatively short, and the failure to file a complaint in Court or with the appropriate administrative agency is usually fatal to a wrongfully terminated employee’s claim.

An Arizona employment lawyer will also be able to help the terminated employee understand his or her obligations and rights. Among other things, terminated employees must mitigate their damages by seeking replacement employment. Where an employer is liable, the employee will normally be entitled to recover lost wages and other damages directly related to the termination.

How the Law Treats Lawsuits by Debt Collectors and Original Creditors Differently

As I have pointed out elsewhere, people can be sued for debt by one of two different kinds of plaintiffs: “original creditors” or “debt collectors.” Broadly speaking, original creditors are the persons who originally claimed that you owed them money for some credit-based transaction. Debt collectors are other entities who either came into possession of the debt after it was delinquent or are acting (as independent contractors) for the original creditor.

Loan “servicers,” who come into possession of the debt immediately after it is incurred and administer the debt in the usual course of business, are considered “original creditors” even though the debt obviously did not originate with them.

Legal Impact of the Entity Suing You

Because original creditors have a direct, non-collection relationship with the general public, they have commercial pressures preventing them from acting too horribly during the collection process. Their collection activities risk alienating or annoying the public and thus, in the eyes of the law at least, they are held in check by the market. Therefore, the law does not provide any remedy against original creditors per se. However, this does not mean that original creditors are permitted to do anything without limits during the debt collection, just that there are no laws directed against them specifically. If they commit “outrageous” and abusive acts, or if they “defame” you by publishing false information, or obviously if they assault you or commit some other crime, you would still have your normal rights under the law.

Some states probably have specific laws directed against the collection process, too, either as part of their “merchandizing” codes or otherwise, so you should not automatically write-off the behavior of original creditors.

Against debt collectors, however, you have much more specific rights. And this goes back to the commercial realities underlying the transactions. There is no customer-based relationship between the debt collectors and the people from whom they are collecting. There only customers are either the original creditors, or none at all-they are acting independently on their own behalf and, as far as the market is concerned, are free to take any actions whatever to collect the money. This has given rise to some extreme and shocking abuses, and it led to the passage of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), among other legislation.

Because of the lack of market countermeasures to debt collectors and the legislative response, the relationship between individuals and debt collectors has become significantly regulated. The FDCPA makes “unfair” or “deceptive” collection techniques illegal in general, and it specifies a large number of particular practices as violations. But even if the action is not specifically named as illegal by the FDCPA it will still be illegal if it is unfair or deceptive. This allows lawyers and individuals fighting on behalf of people abused by debt collectors to be as creative in stopping obnoxious practices as the debt collectors are in creating and implementing them. The FDCPA provides attorneys fees to people suing debt collectors (if they win), but otherwise the remedies are fairly small, with the exception of “personal injuries,” which can include emotional distress. So that opens the door to real money a little bit.

Again I would remind the reader that remedies are not limited either to federal law (FDCPA), as some states may have better laws, or to debt-collection related laws. Reporting false information is defamation, and behaving beyond certain limits is “outrageous” enough for states to provide a remedy. And these remedies likely include punitive damages, various forms of “compensatory” damages, and other forms of relief that can be much more substantial than those provided by the FDCPA.

In conclusion, it is far more advantageous legally to be sued by a debt collector, as the law provides many more remedies against them. You are not without any remedy, however, against the actions of original creditors if they are sufficiently extreme.